Albert Woodfox Is Finally Free

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On February 19, 2016, Louisiana prisoner Albert Woodfox walked free, 44 years after he was first put into solitary confinement.

He was the United States’ longest serving prisoner held in isolation. Nearly every day for more than half of his life, Albert Woodfox woke up in a cell the size of a parking space, surrounded by concrete and steel.

Today, for the first time in more than four decades, he will be able to walk outside and look up into the sky.

Brandan 'Bmike' Odums' mural of Albert Woodfox in New Orleans, Louisiana

Brandan ‘Bmike’ Odums’ mural of Albert Woodfox in New Orleans, Louisiana

Over the course of nearly five years working on Albert Woodfox’s case at Amnesty, I heard many times that the odds were insurmountable.

But I always knew that Albert Woodfox would go home.

I have seen the incredible power of our movement when we work together.

I have seen the courage humility, and determination of so many of you who have played big and small roles to help this historic human rights victory come to fruition.

Albert Woodfox and Herman Wallace

Albert Woodfox and Herman Wallace

I have seen the unbelievable strength of the Angola 3: Robert King, Herman Wallace, and Albert Woodfox himself—all three of whom endured nightmares but persevered with humor, dignity, and resolve to wage a relentless fight against the cruel, inhuman and degrading practice of prolonged solitary confinement in the United States.

With the knowledge of his release, Albert had this message for those who have helped him secure his freedom:

I want to thank my brother Michael for sticking with me all these years, and Robert King, who wrongly spent nearly 30 years in solitary. I could not have survived without their courageous support, along with the support of my dear friend Herman Wallace, who passed away in 2013. I also wish to thank the many members of the International Coalition to Free the Angola 3, Amnesty International, and the Roddick Foundation, all of whom supported me through this long struggle. Lastly, I thank William Sothern, Rob McDuff and my lawyers at Squire Patton Boggs and Sanford Heisler Kimpel for never giving up. Although I was looking forward to proving my innocence at a new trial, concerns about my health and my age have caused me to resolve this case now and obtain my release with this no-contest plea to lesser charges. I hope the events of today will bring closure to many.

I’m carrying those words with me today as we celebrate this victory.

Albert Woodfox walks free—February 19, 2016, his 69th Birthday.

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16 thoughts on “Albert Woodfox Is Finally Free

  1. Not a SECOND too soon, that's for sure! I really wonder what it must feel like, after all this time…

  2. Congratulations to all o worked so long to free Albert Woodfox. His survival is a small miracle and a tribute to Amnesty International.

    Cassandra Moore

  3. We celebrate his release and are saddened that he is the victim of abuse from the "justice" system.

  4. After very many years of looking for a trace of justice and mercy for Albert Woodfox, I am glad to hear at last that he has been freed.

  5. I am happy beyond words. May you find peace, health, joy and many more blessings in this new journey. God bless you and each and everyone who supported and helped you directly or indirectly during this too long struggle. Also those who were the stumbling blocks along the way. In forgiveness we find peace and lightness.

  6. Your a symbol of hope to all who have and are experinceing injustice. A true hero.

  7. I am so full of joy knowing your are out of that horrible prison. You have suffered much. Now it is time for your to experience life at its best. May you be showered with blessings.

  8. Thank you I got all above you mentioned, I'm regular reader even I was donated one time, but I want to say in my Country I'm working at the social development sector for marginalised communities.
    So it'll get chance to serve in our Country I'll be together with your joint hand.
    Thank you

  9. @JasminitaMH great blog. We need to work in more coordination & stronger to help & make campaigners free from prison & detainment. Amnesty working great to help those and we are all Amnestian