Aung San Suu Kyi Finally Free!

By Jim Roberts, Myanmar Country Specialist for Amnesty International USA

STR/AFP/Getty Images

In this season of giving thanks, we are thrilled and grateful for the release today of Aung San Suu Kyi in Myanmar (Burma)!  The government released her after seven and a half years of house arrest.

Will she re-form the National League for Democracy?  Will she continue to advocate for democracy?  Will her release be for good this time, or will the government find another reason for imprisoning her yet again?  Only time will tell.

While we couldn’t be happier about Suu Kyi’s release, time continues to run short for the over 2,200 other political prisoners who are still behind bars in some of the most notorious prisons in the world.  They suffer from lack of medical care, proper nutrition, and lack of contact with their families.  Many are imprisoned hundreds of miles from their homes, making travel for their families difficult if not impossible.

So while we give thanks for Aung San Suu Kyi’s release, let’s do something for the others.  Join us in calling for freedom for all prisoners of conscience in Myanmar!

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24 thoughts on “Aung San Suu Kyi Finally Free!

  1. Dear Mr. Roberts,
    Ihappened to come across a syntax error in this report:
    "They from suffer lack of medical care, proper nutrition, and lack of contact with their families."
    THX

    Regards,
    Z.V.

  2. Congratulations to all at Amnesty who have been working tirelessly for Aung San Suu Kyi 's release! Just for a short time, there can be celebrations before getting back to the other 2200 in need.

  3. Thanks for this, Jim. Historic and joyous news, to be sure. But there are of course many more than 2200 more in need, Valda, in this nation of nearly 60 million people repressed by the brutal junta. Let's hope that Aung San Suu Kyi will be able to resume her rightful role as the leader of the democratic movement, be supported by a growing group of others, and that lasting positive change will finally arrive for the people of Myanmar/Burma. Sad to say, that day remains far in the distance today, happy though we may be to hear of this welcome development.

  4. Dear Mr. Roberts,
    Ihappened to come across a syntax error in this report:
    “They from suffer lack of medical care, proper nutrition, and lack of contact with their families.”
    THX

    Regards,
    Z.V.

  5. Congratulations to all at Amnesty who have been working tirelessly for Aung San Suu Kyi ‘s release! Just for a short time, there can be celebrations before getting back to the other 2200 in need.

  6. Thanks for this, Jim. Historic and joyous news, to be sure. But there are of course many more than 2200 more in need, Valda, in this nation of nearly 60 million people repressed by the brutal junta. Let’s hope that Aung San Suu Kyi will be able to resume her rightful role as the leader of the democratic movement, be supported by a growing group of others, and that lasting positive change will finally arrive for the people of Myanmar/Burma. Sad to say, that day remains far in the distance today, happy though we may be to hear of this welcome development.

  7. Why does AI refer to Burma as Myanmar? I would think that the human rights world would use "Burma".

  8. Wonderful news indeed. But let's not forget the tens of thousands of prisoners in our own country being tortured in solitary confinement, the untold thousands held in ICE gulags where often family don't know where they are, not to mention over crowding, poor nutrition and sub standard medical care for most US prisoners. It's so nice for the people here to express concern for prisoners thousands of miles away, while forgetting those being tortured less than a mile from home

  9. Why does AI refer to Burma as Myanmar? I would think that the human rights world would use “Burma”.

  10. Wonderful news indeed. But let’s not forget the tens of thousands of prisoners in our own country being tortured in solitary confinement, the untold thousands held in ICE gulags where often family don’t know where they are, not to mention over crowding, poor nutrition and sub standard medical care for most US prisoners. It’s so nice for the people here to express concern for prisoners thousands of miles away, while forgetting those being tortured less than a mile from home

  11. @Rachel: Amnesty International follows UN protocol in all instances in determining what name to use in regard to countries. When the UN recognized the change from Union of Burma to Union of Myanmar two decades ago we automatically followed. This is AI's policy in regard to all UN member countries. Therefore, the name we use carries no implication of support or opposition or approval or disapproval of the government in question.

    By the way, the government has recently changed the name again from the Union of Myanmar to the Republic of the Union of Myanmar and if the UN recognizes this latest change so will we.

  12. @Rachel: Amnesty International follows UN protocol in all instances in determining what name to use in regard to countries. When the UN recognized the change from Union of Burma to Union of Myanmar two decades ago we automatically followed. This is AI’s policy in regard to all UN member countries. Therefore, the name we use carries no implication of support or opposition or approval or disapproval of the government in question.

    By the way, the government has recently changed the name again from the Union of Myanmar to the Republic of the Union of Myanmar and if the UN recognizes this latest change so will we.

  13. I was delighted to hear of her release and with our prayers, I believe she can use her own experience to get free countries who will help to reform her beloved country and to restore human rights to her people. I pray that her enemies reconize the plight she has endured out of love for her people and country, will readiate into her country's enemies and blossom throughtout the whole nation.

  14. I was delighted to hear of her release and with our prayers, I believe she can use her own experience to get free countries who will help to reform her beloved country and to restore human rights to her people. I pray that her enemies reconize the plight she has endured out of love for her people and country, will readiate into her country’s enemies and blossom throughtout the whole nation.

  15. Good news for Aung's San Suu Kyi's family. Good news for Burma. Now the world must listen to the Karen people of Burma and all the ethnic minorities within Burma and on the Border of Thailand to end ethnic cleansing of Karen people and other ethnic minorities. Read "Undaunted" the story of the life of Zoya Phan and great information on the brutality of the Burmese military. Suu Kyi has not had to flee her country and her resolve to stay until democracy reigns is admirable. I wish all the people of Burma a free state where equal rights among all its peoples will prevail.

  16. Good news for Aung’s San Suu Kyi’s family. Good news for Burma. Now the world must listen to the Karen people of Burma and all the ethnic minorities within Burma and on the Border of Thailand to end ethnic cleansing of Karen people and other ethnic minorities. Read “Undaunted” the story of the life of Zoya Phan and great information on the brutality of the Burmese military. Suu Kyi has not had to flee her country and her resolve to stay until democracy reigns is admirable. I wish all the people of Burma a free state where equal rights among all its peoples will prevail.