On the ground in Gaza

An Amnesty International delegation recently entered Gaza shortly before Israeli attacks ended to document the true scale of devastation wrought on civilians.  Amnesty researcher Donatella Rovera has been keeping a dairy of their findings.  Here is a excerpt from an entry she posted earlier this week to Livewire:

Today, Tuesday, it seemed as though Gaza was beginning to draw a collective breath after the shock of the past three weeks of Israeli bombardments. The streets, previously deserted, filled up again and tens of thousands of people who had fled their homes for fear of Israeli attacks began returning to them. But thousands have no homes to which to return because so many were destroyed by Israeli forces.

In Gaza City’s Zaitoun neighbourhood, where scores of homes were flattened by Israeli air strikes and bulldozers women and children were rummaging through the rubble of their homes, trying to recover the little that could be salvaged.

At a mourning tent amidst the rubble the surviving member of the Sammouni family received condolences and recited prayers for their 29 relatives killed by Israeli forces. Salah Sammouni told us that Israeli soldiers had evicted them from their home, which they then used as a military base, and told them to stay in their relatives’ house across the road, only to bomb it the following day.

Some died on the spot, they said, while others were left to die, as the Israeli army did not allow the ambulances to approach the house to evacuate the wounded for several days.

We then visited the Qishqu and al-Daya families whose homes were both destroyed by Israeli bombardments. ‘Abdallah Qishqu, whose house was destroyed by an Israeli air strike on 28 December, told us that his wife, who was seriously injured in the attack, still does not know that their eight-year-old daughter, Ibtihal, was killed in the explosion together with their daughter-in-law, Maisa.

At the Shifa hospital, Gaza’s main hospital, the head of the Burns Unit told us that when the first patients with phosphorus burns were brought in, doctors in the Burns Unit did not realise what had caused the injuries.

“The first thing we noticed were cases with orange burns, different from the burns we are used to dealing with. They started with patches and after a while they would become deeper with an offensive odour and after several hours smoke started coming from the wound,” the doctor said.

“We had a child of three years with a head injury. After three hours we changed the dressing and saw smoke coming out of the wound. We opened the wound and brought out this wedge. We had not seen it before. Later on, some colleagues, doctors from Egypt and Norway, were able to enter Gaza and told us that this was white phosphorus.

“We noticed various things about this: the burn does not heal; the phosphorus may remain inside the body and goes on burning there, and the general condition of the patient deteriorates – normally with 10-15% burns, you would expect a cure, now many such patients die,” he said.

Other doctors from the hospital said they had seen patients with strange injuries that appeared to have been caused by unusual weapons (there is speculation that this may include Deep Inert Metal Explosive – DIME weapons) and which they did not know how to deal with. Patients who should be getting better were getting worse.

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5 thoughts on “On the ground in Gaza

  1. We, the people living inside the Israeli boundaries, have the human right to live without anyone bombing our cities.

    We, fathers and mothers in Israel, have the human right to rise our children outside the shelters.

    We, the Jewish people, have the right to defend ourselves and we are taking it because, otherwise, we wouldn't exist anymore.

  2. We, the people living inside the Israeli boundaries, have the human right to live without anyone bombing our cities.

    We, fathers and mothers in Israel, have the human right to rise our children outside the shelters.

    We, the Jewish people, have the right to defend ourselves and we are taking it because, otherwise, we wouldn’t exist anymore.

  3. But your government is killing innocent people. They are not collaborating with the UN and they are using chemical weapons. That does not make you guys any better. There is always two sides to every story. There are suicide bombers and there are non-suicide bombers. They both destroy and take away life. Your government is not doing the right thing. It is only interested in the land. It is what it has been always. But land is nothing, friendship is everything. That Promised Land is not promised to those who kill. It is just another piece of the planet. "… and we are the people of God's pasture,
    and the sheep of God's hand.

    Change comes from within.

  4. But your government is killing innocent people. They are not collaborating with the UN and they are using chemical weapons. That does not make you guys any better. There is always two sides to every story. There are suicide bombers and there are non-suicide bombers. They both destroy and take away life. Your government is not doing the right thing. It is only interested in the land. It is what it has been always. But land is nothing, friendship is everything. That Promised Land is not promised to those who kill. It is just another piece of the planet. “… and we are the people of God’s pasture,
    and the sheep of God’s hand.

    Change comes from within.

  5. Pingback: Under Fire: White Phosphorus, Civilians, and Arkansas | Human Rights Now - Amnesty International USA Blog