Police Chiefs to Death Penalty: Drop Dead

The Death Penalty Information Center released a new study today on the high costs, and lack of real benefits, associated with capital punishment in the United States.  The report, called Smart on Crime:  Reconsidering the Death Penalty in a Time of Economic Crisis, also includes the results of a poll of 500 randomly selected U.S. police chiefs who by a more than 2 to 1 margin reject the idea that the death penalty is a deterrent (an assessment confirmed by criminologists),  and, also by a greater than 2 to 1 margin, believe that the death penalty is used as a tough-on-crime symbol by politicians. 

“Greater use of the death penalty” was listed as the best way to reduce violent crime by only 1% (that’s one percent) of the chiefs surveyed, and only 2% (3% in the South) believed that “insufficient use of the death penalty” interferes with effective law enforcement.

And use of the death penalty is declining anyway.  For almost a decade the numbers of death sentences and executions have continued to drop.  As Richard Dieter, executive director of the Death Penalty Information Center, told CNN “…the death penalty is turning into an expensive form of life without parole.”

Given the current economic crisis, which is hitting state budgets very hard (see pages 12-13 of the report for examples), maintaining a system that doesn’t work, is used less and less,  and yet still costs a fortune is difficult to justify.  As the report observes: “The money spent to preserve this failing system could be directed to effective programs that make society safer.”  In the poll, the police chiefs chose expanded training for officers, community policing, drug and alcohol abuse programs, and neighborhood watch programs all as better uses of limited criminal justice resources.

The death penalty is a grave human rights abuse, a cruel and degrading punishment.  But, for those who don’t see it that way, shouldn’t we listen to law enforcement and focus our taxpayer dollars on real public safety measures?

AIUSA welcomes a lively and courteous discussion that follow our Community Guidelines. Comments are not pre-screened before they post but AIUSA reserves the right to remove any comments violating our guidelines.

42 thoughts on “Police Chiefs to Death Penalty: Drop Dead

  1. "If we execute murderers and there is in fact no deterrent effect, we have killed a bunch of murderers. If we fail to execute murderers, and doing so would in fact have deterred other murders, we have allowed the killing of a bunch of innocent victims. I would much rather risk the former. This, to me, is not a tough call."

    John McAdams – Marquette University/Department of Political Science, on deterrence

  2. Leave it to Brian (not Brian Evans) to screw this up on a good procedure. Sorry, but I agree with criminologists, police chief, and law enforcement officials: We don't need the death penalty to deter murders or crime, because the death penalty DOESN'T WORK! It has too many flaws and it must be disposed of someday to make society safer, especially the murder victims' families and the families of criminals.

  3. “If we execute murderers and there is in fact no deterrent effect, we have killed a bunch of murderers. If we fail to execute murderers, and doing so would in fact have deterred other murders, we have allowed the killing of a bunch of innocent victims. I would much rather risk the former. This, to me, is not a tough call.”

    John McAdams – Marquette University/Department of Political Science, on deterrence

  4. Leave it to Brian (not Brian Evans) to screw this up on a good procedure. Sorry, but I agree with criminologists, police chief, and law enforcement officials: We don’t need the death penalty to deter murders or crime, because the death penalty DOESN’T WORK! It has too many flaws and it must be disposed of someday to make society safer, especially the murder victims’ families and the families of criminals.

  5. Regardless of the cherry picking stats and polls…

    No executed murderer was ever a recidivist. On the other hand, plenty of non-executed murderers (EVEN CONVICTED ONES…EVEN AT TIMES INSIDE PRISON) have repeated this violent crime against innocent people.

    You think the death of a convicted murderer is a tragedy, I don't.

    Want stats?
    15,000 murders happen each year. In the last 30, less then 1,000 people have been executed. Doing some quick math, that amounts to less then 1 convicted murderer for every 450 people murderered are put to death for the crime. Only a very selected few AND DESERVING people are executed.

    Want a poll? http://www.harrisinteractive.com/harris_poll/inde
    69% of the public supports capital punishment. 22% oppose. Police Chiefs are entitled to opinions, but they work for us, not the other way around.

    Want a story?
    A 17 year old young woman had recently enlisted in the U.S. Army and was due to report to basic training the next day. She had just graduated high school and a group of her friends had a celebration party and a going away party for her. She was abducted on her way home after the party. Robert Willie and Joseph Vaccaro were in the middle of a several day murder, rape and robbing spree. She would be there next victim. She was raped multiple times by both "men", stabbed dozens of times, and raped again after she was already dead.

    Your heart bleeds for the Robert Willies and Joseph Vaccaros of the world. Mine doesn't. The fewer of them living and breathing the better. Justice is Served.

  6. Regardless of the cherry picking stats and polls…

    No executed murderer was ever a recidivist. On the other hand, plenty of non-executed murderers (EVEN CONVICTED ONES…EVEN AT TIMES INSIDE PRISON) have repeated this violent crime against innocent people.

    You think the death of a convicted murderer is a tragedy, I don't.

    Want stats?
    15,000 murders happen each year. In the last 30, less then 1,000 people have been executed. Doing some quick math, that amounts to less then 1 convicted murderer for every 450 people murderered are put to death for the crime. Only a very selected few AND DESERVING people are executed.

    Want a poll? http://www.harrisinteractive.com/harris_poll/inde
    69% of the public supports capital punishment. 22% oppose. Police Chiefs are entitled to opinions, but they work for us, not the other way around.

    Want a story?
    A 17 year old young woman had recently enlisted in the U.S. Army and was due to report to basic training the next day. She had just graduated high school and a group of her friends had a celebration party and a going away party for her. She was abducted on her way home after the party. Robert Willie and Joseph Vaccaro were in the middle of a several day murder, rape and robbing spree. She would be there next victim. She was raped multiple times by both "men", stabbed dozens of times, and raped again after she was already dead.

    Your heart bleeds for the Robert Willies and Joseph Vaccaros of the world. Mine doesn't. The fewer of them living and breathing the better. Justice is Served.

  7. Regardless of the cherry picking stats and polls…

    No executed murderer was ever a recidivist. On the other hand, plenty of non-executed murderers (EVEN CONVICTED ONES…EVEN AT TIMES INSIDE PRISON) have repeated this violent crime against innocent people.

    You think the death of a convicted murderer is a tragedy, I don't.

    Want stats?
    15,000 murders happen each year. In the last 30, less then 1,000 people have been executed. Doing some quick math, that amounts to less then 1 convicted murderer for every 450 people murderered are put to death for the crime. Only a very selected few AND DESERVING people are executed.

    Want a poll? http://www.harrisinteractive.com/harris_poll/inde
    69% of the public supports capital punishment. 22% oppose. Police Chiefs are entitled to opinions, but they work for us, not the other way around.

    Want a story?
    A 17 year old young woman had recently enlisted in the U.S. Army and was due to report to basic training the next day. She had just graduated high school and a group of her friends had a celebration party and a going away party for her. She was abducted on her way home after the party. Robert Willie and Joseph Vaccaro were in the middle of a several day murder, rape and robbing spree. She would be there next victim. She was raped multiple times by both "men", stabbed dozens of times, and raped again after she was already dead.

    Your heart bleeds for the Robert Willies and Joseph Vaccaros of the world. Mine doesn't. The fewer of them living and breathing the better. Justice is Served.

  8. 15,000 innocent people brutally murdered every year and some want to advocate for and focus energy, attention, resources to the less than 1,000 people who have been executed in the last 30 years. Mind boggling.

  9. Brian (not Evans), your comments on supporting the death penalty are TRULY a big "f*** you" to AIUSA despite your claims that they are not! You think that executing "the motherf***king S.O.B.s" are okay and brings justice, peace, and closure to murder victims' families, but I don't! You don't care about executing innocent people by what you claim is "a flawless justice system" when it is actually flawed; you accuse me and AIUSA of harboring killers, boasting and wasting money on defense and life imprisonment, and insulting and ignoring victims' families; and you don't care about AIUSA or ANY KIND of human rights, AT ALL!!! :cry:

  10. And the "thumbs-down" button I keep trying to press doesn't work along with the "thumbs-up" button because of a glitch that never increases the number no matter how many button presses I've tried! This STINKS! :cry:

  11. I thought you realized one could disagree without using "#$%& You" language. Guess i was wrong.

    I (unlike you) never referred to convicted murderers as "mother%^&$ing SOBs" I just refer to them as murderers.

    As long as there are those out there committing grievous capital punishment type offenses i will support the death penalty. I'll also poke holes in A.I.s cherry picked claims, stats, figures and numbers…as well as any other organization whose goal it is to abolish the death penalty.

    No executed murderer was ever a recidivist.

    Good day ma'am.

  12. Regardless of the cherry picking stats and polls…

    No executed murderer was ever a recidivist. On the other hand, plenty of non-executed murderers (EVEN CONVICTED ONES…EVEN AT TIMES INSIDE PRISON) have repeated this violent crime against innocent people.

    You think the death of a convicted murderer is a tragedy, I don’t.

    Want stats?
    15,000 murders happen each year. In the last 30, less then 1,000 people have been executed. Doing some quick math, that amounts to less then 1 convicted murderer for every 450 people murderered are put to death for the crime. Only a very selected few AND DESERVING people are executed.

    Want a poll?
    http://www.harrisinteractive.com/harris_poll/index.asp?PID=431
    69% of the public supports capital punishment. 22% oppose. Police Chiefs are entitled to opinions, but they work for us, not the other way around.

    Want a story?
    A 17 year old young woman had recently enlisted in the U.S. Army and was due to report to basic training the next day. She had just graduated high school and a group of her friends had a celebration party and a going away party for her. She was abducted on her way home after the party. Robert Willie and Joseph Vaccaro were in the middle of a several day murder, rape and robbing spree. She would be there next victim. She was raped multiple times by both “men”, stabbed dozens of times, and raped again after she was already dead.

    Your heart bleeds for the Robert Willies and Joseph Vaccaros of the world. Mine doesn’t. The fewer of them living and breathing the better. Justice is Served.

  13. 15,000 innocent people brutally murdered every year and some want to advocate for and focus energy, attention, resources to the less than 1,000 people who have been executed in the last 30 years. Mind boggling.

  14. I think that the death penalty should be abolished because of the depravation of human dignity on the one being executed. How can we know that we are not instilling pain on the executee? They will be dead before they can give us a response. We search for a way to humanely execute criminals but there is no such thing as a "dignified" death so how can it be justified?

  15. Christopher Baker, your comment is as great as mine, and I respect you. Also, in response to Robert Lee Willie and Joseph Vaccaro's murder of Faith Hathaway, Vacarro is now serving a life sentence, while Willie is now a figure along with Elmo Patrick Sonnier in Sister Helen Prejean's memoir "Dead Man Walking". Also, eight days after the murder of Faith Hathaway, Willie and Vaccaro had attacked a young couple, shooting boyfriend Mark Brewster and leaving him paralyzed and raping teenage Debbie Cuevas (now Debbie Morris). She wanted the criminals brought to justice, but when she learned of the death sentence given to Willie, she wasn't sure whether justice was served or if what she did was vengeful, which goes against her Christian beliefs. After some counseling with Sister Prejean, Morris confronted Willie on death row, and after some conversation she forgave him for attacking her and for the murder of Hathaway, which was something that Hathaway's family had never done during his trial and sentencing. She learned that forgiving the criminal for the most heinous acts could mean that it would not set him free after the wrong he had done but to ensure that he would be locked away from society in jail for life while it would release the forgiver from all the anger that they would let go of. She now speaks out against the death penalty, and her ordeals and forgiveness were later written in her memoir "Forgiving the Dead Man Walking", which is now available on this Amazon.com website here:
    http://www.amazon.com/Forgiving-Dead-Man-Walking-

  16. Christopher Baker, your comment is as great as mine, and I respect you. Also, in response to Robert Lee Willie and Joseph Vaccaro's murder of Faith Hathaway, Vacarro is now serving a life sentence, while Willie is now a figure along with Elmo Patrick Sonnier in Sister Helen Prejean's memoir "Dead Man Walking". Also, eight days after the murder of Faith Hathaway, Willie and Vaccaro had attacked a young couple, shooting boyfriend Mark Brewster and leaving him paralyzed and raping teenage Debbie Cuevas (now Debbie Morris). She wanted the criminals brought to justice, but when she learned of the death sentence given to Willie, she wasn't sure whether justice was served or if what she did was vengeful, which goes against her Christian beliefs. After some counseling with Sister Prejean, Morris confronted Willie on death row, and after some conversation she forgave him for attacking her and for the murder of Hathaway, which was something that Hathaway's family had never done during his trial and sentencing. She learned that forgiving the criminal for the most heinous acts could mean that it would not set him free after the wrong he had done but to ensure that he would be locked away from society in jail for life while it would release the forgiver from all the anger that they would let go of. She now speaks out against the death penalty, and her ordeals and forgiveness were later written in her memoir "Forgiving the Dead Man Walking", which is now available on this Amazon.com website here:
    http://www.amazon.com/Forgiving-Dead-Man-Walking-

  17. Christopher Baker, your comment is as great as mine, and I respect you. Also, in response to Robert Lee Willie and Joseph Vaccaro's murder of Faith Hathaway, Vacarro is now serving a life sentence, while Willie is now a figure along with Elmo Patrick Sonnier in Sister Helen Prejean's memoir "Dead Man Walking". Also, eight days after the murder of Faith Hathaway, Willie and Vaccaro had attacked a young couple, shooting boyfriend Mark Brewster and leaving him paralyzed and raping teenage Debbie Cuevas (now Debbie Morris). She wanted the criminals brought to justice, but when she learned of the death sentence given to Willie, she wasn't sure whether justice was served or if what she did was vengeful, which goes against her Christian beliefs. After some counseling with Sister Prejean, Morris confronted Willie on death row, and after some conversation she forgave him for attacking her and for the murder of Hathaway, which was something that Hathaway's family had never done during his trial and sentencing. She learned that forgiving the criminal for the most heinous acts could mean that it would not set him free after the wrong he had done but to ensure that he would be locked away from society in jail for life while it would release the forgiver from all the anger that they would let go of. She now speaks out against the death penalty, and her ordeals and forgiveness were later written in her memoir "Forgiving the Dead Man Walking", which is now available on this Amazon.com website here:
    http://www.amazon.com/Forgiving-Dead-Man-Walking-

  18. Brian (not Evans), your comments on supporting the death penalty are TRULY a big “f*** you” to AIUSA despite your claims that they are not! You think that executing “the motherf***king S.O.B.s” are okay and brings justice, peace, and closure to murder victims’ families, but I don’t! You don’t care about executing innocent people by what you claim is “a flawless justice system” when it is actually flawed; you accuse me and AIUSA of harboring killers, boasting and wasting money on defense and life imprisonment, and insulting and ignoring victims’ families; and you don’t care about AIUSA or ANY KIND of human rights, AT ALL!!! :cry:

  19. And the “thumbs-down” button I keep trying to press doesn’t work along with the “thumbs-up” button because of a glitch that never increases the number no matter how many button presses I’ve tried! This STINKS! :cry:

  20. I thought you realized one could disagree without using “#$%& You” language. Guess i was wrong.

    I (unlike you) never referred to convicted murderers as “mother%^&$ing SOBs” I just refer to them as murderers.

    As long as there are those out there committing grievous capital punishment type offenses i will support the death penalty. I’ll also poke holes in A.I.s cherry picked claims, stats, figures and numbers…as well as any other organization whose goal it is to abolish the death penalty.

    No executed murderer was ever a recidivist.

    Good day ma’am.

  21. I think that the death penalty should be abolished because of the depravation of human dignity on the one being executed. How can we know that we are not instilling pain on the executee? They will be dead before they can give us a response. We search for a way to humanely execute criminals but there is no such thing as a “dignified” death so how can it be justified?

  22. Christopher Baker, your comment is as great as mine, and I respect you. Also, in response to Robert Lee Willie and Joseph Vaccaro’s murder of Faith Hathaway, Vacarro is now serving a life sentence, while Willie is now a figure along with Elmo Patrick Sonnier in Sister Helen Prejean’s memoir “Dead Man Walking”. Also, eight days after the murder of Faith Hathaway, Willie and Vaccaro had attacked a young couple, shooting boyfriend Mark Brewster and leaving him paralyzed and raping teenage Debbie Cuevas (now Debbie Morris). She wanted the criminals brought to justice, but when she learned of the death sentence given to Willie, she wasn’t sure whether justice was served or if what she did was vengeful, which goes against her Christian beliefs. After some counseling with Sister Prejean, Morris confronted Willie on death row, and after some conversation she forgave him for attacking her and for the murder of Hathaway, which was something that Hathaway’s family had never done during his trial and sentencing. She learned that forgiving the criminal for the most heinous acts could mean that it would not set him free after the wrong he had done but to ensure that he would be locked away from society in jail for life while it would release the forgiver from all the anger that they would let go of. She now speaks out against the death penalty, and her ordeals and forgiveness were later written in her memoir “Forgiving the Dead Man Walking”, which is now available on this Amazon.com website here:

    http://www.amazon.com/Forgiving-Dead-Man-Walking-Entire/dp/0310231876/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1256163209&sr=8-1

  23. I know the story, thanks for sharing and for the debate.

    Debbie Cuevas was certainly in a position (if she chose) to forgive HER assailants. Her forgiving them for murdering Hathaway? Paralyzing her boyfriend? How does that work…? With all respect to her, who is she to forgive them for murdering SOMEONE ELSE?

    If I'm murdered, are YOU the one who forgives the person who murdered me?

    Chris Baker and Debbie Kearns… I don't agree. I don't take are disagreements personal…I would suggest you don't either Ms. Kearns.

    No executed murderer was ever a recidivist.

  24. "If I’m murdered, are YOU the one who forgives the person who murdered me?"

    Yes, I am, while thinking of an appropriate punishment for murder as well (I don't condone it), and I don't think that the death penalty is an appropriate punishment for crimes like murder, because life imprisonment is a more appropriate punishment than the death penalty. Besides, there are much worse things in life than death. If you disagree with me, then I'm not gonna waste my time arguing with you, Brian (just Brian, not Evans), because I'm ignoring you. Good day! :x

  25. I know the story, thanks for sharing and for the debate.

    Debbie Cuevas was certainly in a position (if she chose) to forgive HER assailants. Her forgiving them for murdering Hathaway? Paralyzing her boyfriend? How does that work…? With all respect to her, who is she to forgive them for murdering SOMEONE ELSE?

    If I’m murdered, are YOU the one who forgives the person who murdered me?

    Chris Baker and Debbie Kearns… I don’t agree. I don’t take are disagreements personal…I would suggest you don’t either Ms. Kearns.

    No executed murderer was ever a recidivist.

  26. "I don't think that the death penalty is an appropriate punishment for crimes like murder, because life imprisonment is a more appropriate punishment than the death penalty" <—- Your and some others "Opinion"

    69% of Americans disagree <—- Fact

    No executed Murder was ever a recidivist <—- Fact

    Less then 1 murderer per every 450 people murdered are ever executed <—- Fact

    An overwhelming majority of murder convictions DO NOT result in a death sentence. In many cases a life sentence or even less can and will be a more appropriate sentence for murder. HOWEVER, there are extenuating and mitigating circumstances to consider…and the death penalty should always be an option for the most egregious of capital offenses. Deterance is debatable, but only one of many factors that are considered.

    I'm thankful that precedent, current federal law, and some states recognize the lawfullness and appropriateness of capital punishment in the most heinous of crimes.

    I wish an organization like A.I. much success when it comes to worthy causes like Darfur (you and like minded individuals in the A.I. community should consider spending your valuable time and limited resources on the hundreds and thousands of people who have been true victims of GENOCIDE, murdered, raped, beaten, tortured, starved, houses burnt to ground, everything stolen from them at the hands of the Sudanese Government and Janjaweed) …but I will continue to oppose its stance on the death penalty.

    My heart bleeds for murdered victims and victims of genocide. My heart doesn't bleed for the convicted murder sentenced to death.

    I would suggest you adjust your focus on true crimes against humanity.

    I understand it is difficult for you to have a debate and the easier thing to do is ignore me. So you are welcome to ignore all my future posts if you wish. Infact, in some ways I prefer it that anyway.

    Thank you, Good Day!

  27. “If I’m murdered, are YOU the one who forgives the person who murdered me?”

    Yes, I am, while thinking of an appropriate punishment for murder as well (I don’t condone it), and I don’t think that the death penalty is an appropriate punishment for crimes like murder, because life imprisonment is a more appropriate punishment than the death penalty. Besides, there are much worse things in life than death. If you disagree with me, then I’m not gonna waste my time arguing with you, Brian (just Brian, not Evans), because I’m ignoring you. Good day! :x

  28. “I don’t think that the death penalty is an appropriate punishment for crimes like murder, because life imprisonment is a more appropriate punishment than the death penalty” <—- Your and some others "Opinion"

    69% of Americans disagree <—- Fact

    No executed Murder was ever a recidivist <—- Fact

    Less then 1 murderer per every 450 people murdered are ever executed <—- Fact

    An overwhelming majority of murder convictions DO NOT result in a death sentence. In many cases a life sentence or even less can and will be a more appropriate sentence for murder. HOWEVER, there are extenuating and mitigating circumstances to consider…and the death penalty should always be an option for the most egregious of capital offenses. Deterance is debatable, but only one of many factors that are considered.

    I'm thankful that precedent, current federal law, and some states recognize the lawfullness and appropriateness of capital punishment in the most heinous of crimes.

    I wish an organization like A.I. much success when it comes to worthy causes like Darfur (you and like minded individuals in the A.I. community should consider spending your valuable time and limited resources on the hundreds and thousands of people who have been true victims of GENOCIDE, murdered, raped, beaten, tortured, starved, houses burnt to ground, everything stolen from them at the hands of the Sudanese Government and Janjaweed) …but I will continue to oppose its stance on the death penalty.

    My heart bleeds for murdered victims and victims of genocide. My heart doesn't bleed for the convicted murder sentenced to death.

    I would suggest you adjust your focus on true crimes against humanity.

    I understand it is difficult for you to have a debate and the easier thing to do is ignore me. So you are welcome to ignore all my future posts if you wish. Infact, in some ways I prefer it that anyway.

    Thank you, Good Day!

  29. Debbie Kearns is more gentlehearted than her passionate words convey.

    But indeed Brian speaks with solid justice when he demands how one can forgive a crime done someone else ?

    i have no absolute positions, for or against taking life, but bind everything within the context of the "taking".

    i am against the death penalty, but i am equally against its opponents' oftentime abuse of their "positions".

    i wouldn't bar Brian from speaking nor Debbie from disengaging communication, for both have that supreme right.

    But i do see you both wedded to justice — one for the murdered one, one for the murderer, for indeed both the murdered & the murderer very often have a case.

    Just one slim life separates you two.

    i ask you — should justice not have power ?

    Once you have the murderer in your grip, & he can no longer harm, does society have any power to process him towards growing or even germinating "understanding" of self, of action ?

    Or will we let the politician or "law"man dispense with him for us, for the interests of his own reelection & ascent in "power" ?

    See the death penaltyers like Bush, who send millions to their deaths in unjust wars after signing the execution papers for someone whose father didn't grease his slimy path upward towards a reigning smirkdom over creation.That death dealing signature multiplied many times over finally wins him the coveted position even his parents thought he could never gain.

    When you see what a crazy world it is you're in, do you really wonder some men & women lose their way in it & do dark & insane things ?

    In the end,don't underestimate the powers of the "convict" — he finds his own wise understanding of the system we're all in once he's in its bowels, & very often he comes closer to regaining his own life than we who live in apparent control of ours.

  30. Debbie Kearns is more gentlehearted than her passionate words convey.

    But indeed Brian speaks with solid justice when he demands how one can forgive a crime done someone else ?

    i have no absolute positions, for or against taking life, but bind everything within the context of the “taking”.

    i am against the death penalty, but i am equally against its opponents’ oftentime abuse of their “positions”.

    i wouldn’t bar Brian from speaking nor Debbie from disengaging communication, for both have that supreme right.

    But i do see you both wedded to justice — one for the murdered one, one for the murderer, for indeed both the murdered & the murderer very often have a case.

    Just one slim life separates you two.

    i ask you — should justice not have power ?

    Once you have the murderer in your grip, & he can no longer harm, does society have any power to process him towards growing or even germinating “understanding” of self, of action ?

    Or will we let the politician or “law”man dispense with him for us, for the interests of his own reelection & ascent in “power” ?

    See the death penaltyers like Bush, who send millions to their deaths in unjust wars after signing the execution papers for someone whose father didn’t grease his slimy path upward towards a reigning smirkdom over creation.That death dealing signature multiplied many times over finally wins him the coveted position even his parents thought he could never gain.

    When you see what a crazy world it is you’re in, do you really wonder some men & women lose their way in it & do dark & insane things ?

    In the end,don’t underestimate the powers of the “convict” — he finds his own wise understanding of the system we’re all in once he’s in its bowels, & very often he comes closer to regaining his own life than we who live in apparent control of ours.

  31. @Brian111 – Your posts were flagged as spam by our filter due to repeat postings. Not all comments are posted immediately – please give our moderators time to approve your posts before trying to re-post.

  32. @Brian111 – Your posts were flagged as spam by our filter due to repeat postings. Not all comments are posted immediately – please give our moderators time to approve your posts before trying to re-post.

  33. Leave it to the liberals to use their "economic recession" to attack the death penalty. I have to hand it to Brian for his factual attack on yet another bleeding heart scheme. When one knowingly takes the life of another, that person has lost his right to free life and for that matter, life in general. It is just that simple.

    I believe the best comment made on here was the first.

  34. Leave it to the liberals to use their “economic recession” to attack the death penalty. I have to hand it to Brian for his factual attack on yet another bleeding heart scheme. When one knowingly takes the life of another, that person has lost his right to free life and for that matter, life in general. It is just that simple.

    I believe the best comment made on here was the first.