Meet Noor at the AGM: Field Organizer

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Leading up to our 2015 human rights conference in Brooklyn, NY, March 20-22, we are highlighting six Amnesty International USA staff members and moments in their life that have helped build their career in the human rights movement! Read all six in our “Meet me at the AGM” blog series.

NAME: ­­­­­­Noor Mir

I WORK FOR AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL USA AS: Associate Field Organizer

IN THAT ROLE I:

  • Move people to act
  • Inspire youth to take empowerment into their own hands
  • Build coalitions of human rights activists
  • Challenge power at the source

HOW DID YOU GET THERE?
I was born and raised in Islamabad, Pakistan to a family that had been at the forefront of political struggles and independence movements from the British Empire. SEE THE REST OF THIS POST

Meet Sunil at the AGM: Managing Director of Major Gifts

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Leading up to our 2015 human rights conference in Brooklyn, NY, March 20-22, we are highlighting six Amnesty International USA staff members and moments in their life that have helped build their career in the human rights movement! Read all six in our “Meet me at the AGM” blog series.

NAME: ­­­­­­Sunil Oommen

I WORK FOR AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL USA AS: Managing Director of Major Gifts

IN THAT ROLE I:

  • Help raise funds to keep Amnesty’s work going strong
  • Support a team of amazing professionals to raise as much money as possible for Amnesty and help them become even stronger leaders for the movement

HOW DID YOU GET THERE?
I got here due to a lot of hard work – the proverbial blood, sweat and tears! SEE THE REST OF THIS POST

Meet Sara at the AGM: Direct Response Coordinator

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Leading up to our 2015 human rights conference in Brooklyn, NY, March 20-22, we are highlighting six Amnesty International USA staff members and moments in their life that have helped build their career in the human rights movement! Read all six in our “Meet me at the AGM” blog series.

NAME: Sara Golden

I WORK FOR AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL USA AS: Direct Response Coordinator

IN THAT ROLE I:

  • Get copy and design approved for our direct mail packages
  • Lead the coordination of marketing and sales management and execution of programs for Direct Response and special projects.
  • Assist in the development and implementation of annual Direct Response plans and programs.
  • Liaise with cross functioning staff to communicate deadlines and plans effectively and consistently.
  • Act as a source of information for the Direct Response and Development offices.

HOW DID YOU GET THERE?
I began at Amnesty as the Assistant to the Deputy Executive Director of External Affairs in 2012. Previously I worked as an HR consultant at UNICEF and held several internships at NGOs during my time in graduate school. SEE THE REST OF THIS POST

Meet Anupriya at the AGM: Digital Campaign Strategist

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Leading up to our 2015 human rights conference in Brooklyn, NY, March 20-22, we are highlighting six Amnesty International USA staff members and moments in their life that have helped build their career in the human rights movement! Read all six in our “Meet me at the AGM” blog series.

NAME: Anupriya Ghate

I WORK FOR AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL USA AS: Digital Campaign Strategist

IN THAT ROLE I:

  • Manage, create and drive human rights activism on Facebook, Twitter & other online platforms
  • Do a lot of graphic design work to create resources and visually captivating graphics to maximize impact
  • Create online resources and web content to support staff and activists

HOW DID YOU GET THERE?
I started working for Amnesty International USA right after I graduated from Virginia Commonwealth University. I joined the organization as an intern and later applied for and was hired as the Individuals at Risk team, Campaigns Associate. SEE THE REST OF THIS POST

Moving Together to End Police Brutality

South African police block a march by protesting miners in Rustenburg after a security crackdown in the restive platinum belt where officers shot dead 34 strikers (Photo Credit: Alexander Joe/AFP/GettyImages).

I spend my evenings reading Twitter these days. Scroll, refresh. Scroll, refresh. I’m looking for news, yes, but I’m really looking to see if the people that I know who are protesting are still safe.

Last night, I clicked on a video of protestors gathered in front of the Ferguson police department chanting, “Why you wearing riot gear? We don’t see no riot here!” In the echo of that chant runs an anxiety based on experience: that the tension in each new moment could explode in a canister of teargas or pepper spray, in the blast of a sound cannon, in the firing of rubber bullets.

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Ferguson Resignations Underline Need for National Criminal Justice Reform

Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images

Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images

Several Ferguson, Missouri officials have now resigned after the release of a scathing Department of Justice (DOJ) report on that city’s police department that documented a widespread pattern of racial discrimination. What is now needed is implementation of criminal justice reforms not only within Ferguson but also nationwide.

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An Iran Specialist Goes to Selma

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I spend much of my Amnesty International time working on Iran, but I just had to go to Selma, Alabama for the 50th anniversary commemoration of “Bloody Sunday” March 7, 1965—the day that about 600 peaceful African-American protesters attempting to cross the Edmund Pettus Bridge in their campaign for voting rights were attacked and brutalized by state troopers and others.

I was privileged to be part of an Amnesty International delegation to the Selma Jubilee, headed by Executive Director Steve Hawkins, and including about 50 activists and staff from the Chicago area, St. Louis, Atlanta, New York and DC. SEE THE REST OF THIS POST

Honduran journalist told he would be found “in a ditch”

Honduran journalists take part in a vigil in memory of journalists killed in Honduras. (ORLANDO SIERRA/AFP/GettyImages)

Honduran journalists take part in a vigil in memory of journalists killed in Honduras. (ORLANDO SIERRA/AFP/GettyImages)

On January 24, a high-ranking military official told Honduran journalist César Omar Silva Rosales that he would be found “in a ditch, gagged and with yellow legs” if he continued to produce unfavorable coverage of the military. Even more shocking, the official made this threat directly to the journalist’s face as he was trying to cover a congressional session on military policy. Amnesty International has issued an urgent action in this case. SEE THE REST OF THIS POST

Free Speech Should Be Worth More Than Diamonds in Angola

Angolan President Jose Eduardo dos Santos shakes hands with US Secretary of State John Kerry on May 5, 2014. SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images

Angolan President Jose Eduardo dos Santos shakes hands with US Secretary of State John Kerry on May 5, 2014. SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images

How many attempts by your government to keep you quiet through harassment, arrests and trials would it take before you stopped trying to hold them to account? For Rafael Marques, nothing the Angolan government has thrown at him will keep him silent. Rafael goes on trial this month for writing a book accusing army generals in Angola of alleged human rights abuses. We are calling on the US State Department to raise our free speech concerns for Rafael and all citizens to the Angola government. SEE THE REST OF THIS POST

From Ferguson to Selma: An Activist’s Journey

Larry Fellows III (right) traveled to Selma, Alabama with Amnesty International USA for the 50th anniversary of "Bloody Sunday."  (Photo: Amnesty International)

Larry Fellows III (right) traveled to Selma, Alabama with Amnesty International USA for the 50th anniversary of “Bloody Sunday.”

This post was originally published on Ebony

I’m riding with folks from St. Louis on a nine hour trip to Selma. A fellow activist, Tiffany, asks the group, “When did you realize you were Black?”I thought about that question and imagined how different this ride would have been in 1965. The fear of being pulled over by a police officer on a back road and beaten to death while being called “boy,” “monkey” or “nigger.”

We are still dealing with the fear of interacting with police today. Black people are being targeted by law enforcement at an alarming rate and a “routine” traffic stop can still become a death sentence. “This ain’t no walk in the park,” fellow St. Louis native, activist, and comedian Dick Gregory tells me as we stand in the warm sun waiting for President Obama’s arrival.

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