Support Women as Peacebuilders

Almost 10 years ago, on October 31, 2000, the United Nations Security Council adopted resolution 1325, calling for women’s equal participation in peace building. Security Council Resolution (SCR) 1325 was a response to the disturbing trend that women and girls often suffer most during conflicts, including as displaced civilians or as the targets of sexual violence.  A recent horrific example of widespread sexual violence was the reported mass rapes in the Democratic Republic of Congo in August of this year.  Despite women deeply suffering the consequences of conflict, they have few opportunities to contribute to peacebuidling - women account for only 10% of the people who negotiate peace after conflict has ceased.

Adoption of 1325  created an opportunity to promote women’s rights in conflict situations and called for full and equal access in all elements of peace-building negotiations and post-conflict reconstruction. However, implementation of the resolution has been too slow.

Mark the 10th Anniversary of SCR 1325 by taking action to  make women count for peace. Sign UNIFEM’s petition encouraging governments to act rapidly in taking steps to implement the resolution by prosecuting perpetrators of sexual violence, ensuring women participate equally in peace negotiations and all post-conflict decision-making institutions and increasing the number of women in troops, police forces and civilians within international peacekeeping efforts.  The petition will be delivered to the UN Security Council and the Secretary General next week so take action now!  Help make women count for peace. 

Women and children escape the fighting in Maidan, northwest Pakistan, 27 April 2009.

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10 thoughts on “Support Women as Peacebuilders

  1. Isn't it kind of a "chicken before the egg" scenario? If women were respected enough in some of these countries to take part in peace negotiations, perhaps they wouldn't have to suffer as they do in periods of violence. Unfortunately, it really is up to the men in those countries to allow women to participate more.

  2. No, it's not up to the men.

    It never is.

    It is only up to the women.

    To join together.

    & fight.

  3. Isn’t it kind of a “chicken before the egg” scenario? If women were respected enough in some of these countries to take part in peace negotiations, perhaps they wouldn’t have to suffer as they do in periods of violence. Unfortunately, it really is up to the men in those countries to allow women to participate more.

  4. No, it’s not up to the men.

    It never is.

    It is only up to the women.

    To join together.

    & fight.

  5. Increasing signs of cognitive dissonance from Amnesty. On one hand you want women to become peace-builders (a laudable aim that no-one will argue against), yet on the other hand, you run away from opportunities to let women become 'peace-builders'. Why?

    The three 'Ugly Sisters' of international human rights (AI, HRW and ICG) have refused to attend and participate in Sri Lanka's 'Lessons Learnt & Reconciliation Committee (LLRC) with a truly pathetic excuse: "they said it would be impossible to have a free and independent inquiry in Sri Lanka even more than 12 months since the end of fighting on the island nation." http://tinyurl.com/35ux3ez

    Don't the peace-building women of Sri Lanka deserve better from their supposed human rights advocates than this weasel-worded excuse to avoid speaking and being asked difficult questions at the LLRC?

  6. Increasing signs of cognitive dissonance from Amnesty. On one hand you want women to become peace-builders (a laudable aim that no-one will argue against), yet on the other hand, you run away from opportunities to let women become 'peace-builders'. Why?

    The three 'Ugly Sisters' of international human rights (AI, HRW and ICG) have refused to attend and participate in Sri Lanka's 'Lessons Learnt & Reconciliation Committee (LLRC) with a truly pathetic excuse: "they said it would be impossible to have a free and independent inquiry in Sri Lanka even more than 12 months since the end of fighting on the island nation." http://tinyurl.com/35ux3ez

    Don't the peace-building women of Sri Lanka deserve better from their supposed human rights advocates than this weasel-worded excuse to avoid speaking and being asked difficult questions at the LLRC?

  7. Increasing signs of cognitive dissonance from Amnesty. On one hand you want women to become peace-builders (a laudable aim that no-one will argue against), yet on the other hand, you run away from opportunities to let women become ‘peace-builders’. Why?

    The three ‘Ugly Sisters’ of international human rights (AI, HRW and ICG) have refused to attend and participate in Sri Lanka’s ‘Lessons Learnt & Reconciliation Committee (LLRC) with a truly pathetic excuse: “they said it would be impossible to have a free and independent inquiry in Sri Lanka even more than 12 months since the end of fighting on the island nation.” http://tinyurl.com/35ux3ez

    Don’t the peace-building women of Sri Lanka deserve better from their supposed human rights advocates than this weasel-worded excuse to avoid speaking and being asked difficult questions at the LLRC?