Everything Happens Twice in Guinea-Bissau

So far this year there have been two rounds of assassinations in Guinea-Bissau. Now there will be two rounds of elections.

The assassination in March of President Vieira forced elections to be held June 28th to determine the new leader. The vote occurred without violence and a 60% voter turn out, but the field of eleven candidates split the vote, leaving no candidate with a majority vote. Both of the remaining candidates are also going for their second round of Presidency. Ruling party candidate Malam Bacai Sanha was interim President from 1999-2000 following one of the many coups riddling Guinea-Bissau’s political history. Kumba Yala was President from 2000-2003 until he was deposed by a coup.

The run-off is projected to be on July 28th. Both candidates have promised to curb the drug trafficking in the country. It remains to be seen whether the army will involve itself in the election outcome.

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4 thoughts on “Everything Happens Twice in Guinea-Bissau

  1. Things may happen in twos in Guinea-Bissau, but this second round of elections shows the country is compiling with its constitutional electoral law that states a president-elect must win at least 50% of the vote. We commend Bissau-Guineans for their dedication to a peaceful and stable society. Guinea-Bissau has struggled through many challenges since its independence from Portugal more than 25 years ago. However, given the recent chaotic events, the country is fairing relatively well and the first round of elections were deemed free, fair and calm. We received an update from one of our local partners, who said the elections were conducted in a very peaceful manner. We see this as potential turning point and not just a series of tumultuous events. BEFORE, a partnership project of swisspeace and the Alliance for Peacebuilding, has been working in Guinea-Bissau since 2005 to prevent large-scale political violence. We believe that wars can be prevented – if we act at the right time with the right response and we are working to end political violence today – before it’s too late. With local partners in the lead, we are putting every means possible to maintain peace in the region. We hope that the next round of elections will be just as peaceful as the first round and that the election results will be accepted by all parties.

  2. Things may happen in twos in Guinea-Bissau, but this second round of elections shows the country is compiling with its constitutional electoral law that states a president-elect must win at least 50% of the vote. We commend Bissau-Guineans for their dedication to a peaceful and stable society. Guinea-Bissau has struggled through many challenges since its independence from Portugal more than 25 years ago. However, given the recent chaotic events, the country is fairing relatively well and the first round of elections were deemed free, fair and calm. We received an update from one of our local partners, who said the elections were conducted in a very peaceful manner. We see this as potential turning point and not just a series of tumultuous events. BEFORE, a partnership project of swisspeace and the Alliance for Peacebuilding, has been working in Guinea-Bissau since 2005 to prevent large-scale political violence. We believe that wars can be prevented – if we act at the right time with the right response and we are working to end political violence today – before it’s too late. With local partners in the lead, we are putting every means possible to maintain peace in the region. We hope that the next round of elections will be just as peaceful as the first round and that the election results will be accepted by all parties.

  3. Things may happen in twos in Guinea-Bissau, but this second round of elections shows the country is compiling with its constitutional electoral law that states a president-elect must win at least 50% of the vote. We commend Bissau-Guineans for their dedication to a peaceful and stable society. Guinea-Bissau has struggled through many challenges since its independence from Portugal more than 25 years ago. However, given the recent chaotic events, the country is fairing relatively well and the first round of elections were deemed free, fair and calm. We received an update from one of our local partners, who said the elections were conducted in a very peaceful manner. We see this as potential turning point and not just a series of tumultuous events. BEFORE, a partnership project of swisspeace and the Alliance for Peacebuilding, has been working in Guinea-Bissau since 2005 to prevent large-scale political violence. We believe that wars can be prevented – if we act at the right time with the right response and we are working to end political violence today – before it’s too late. With local partners in the lead, we are putting every means possible to maintain peace in the region. We hope that the next round of elections will be just as peaceful as the first round and that the election results will be accepted by all parties.

  4. Things may happen in twos in Guinea-Bissau, but this second round of elections shows the country is compiling with its constitutional electoral law that states a president-elect must win at least 50% of the vote. We commend Bissau-Guineans for their dedication to a peaceful and stable society. Guinea-Bissau has struggled through many challenges since its independence from Portugal more than 25 years ago. However, given the recent chaotic events, the country is fairing relatively well and the first round of elections were deemed free, fair and calm. We received an update from one of our local partners, who said the elections were conducted in a very peaceful manner. We see this as potential turning point and not just a series of tumultuous events. BEFORE, a partnership project of swisspeace and the Alliance for Peacebuilding, has been working in Guinea-Bissau since 2005 to prevent large-scale political violence. We believe that wars can be prevented – if we act at the right time with the right response and we are working to end political violence today – before it’s too late. With local partners in the lead, we are putting every means possible to maintain peace in the region. We hope that the next round of elections will be just as peaceful as the first round and that the election results will be accepted by all parties.